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logo-respect-uefaDublin Airport Football Club Code of Conduct

We all have a responsibility to promote high standards of behaviour in the game. Recently, in the UK, the FA’s surveyed 37,000 grassroots participants, of which behaviour was the biggest concern in the game. This included the abuse of match officials and the unacceptable behaviour of over competitive parents, spectators and coaches on the sideline. Play your part and observe daa football club’s Respect Code of Conduct in everything you do.

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                         SOCIAL MEDIA CODE OF CONDUCTDAAFC1 Logo

1. Social media can be fun, helpful and dangerous.

Comments, notes and photos posted on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp and on-line forums are usually constructive and positive. But negative comments and images, bullying, criticism and sexist remarks can be dangerous and harmful to people’s wellbeing and reputation and the image of the sport.

2. Do not use social media to be critical of teammates, managers, coaches, officials, administrators, volunteers or spectators.

Any comment you make on social media sites has the potential to be seen by
thousands of people. That is great if comments are positive. But it can be extremely negative and harmful if critical of people. Before you post a comment on social media
ask yourself this: Would I want thousands of people to read something negative about me?

3. Always assume the person you are talking/writing about will see what has been said/written.

Just because an online chat is between two people does not mean it remains private and nobody else can see it. Social media is accessible to everyone. Even if the person you are discussing does not see it, somebody else may. The result is you rather than the person you are ridiculing will be seen in a negative light.

whatsapp24. Use social media as a positive outlet to promote players, teammates, teams, clubs and others involved in football.

Posting results and acknowledging individual and team performances on social media makes many people aware of team and individual achievements. That can have a positive effect for many people and should be used, encouraged and embraced wherever and whenever possible.

5. Remember to show respect.

When using social media, show the same respect and regard for people that you would show and are expected to show when playing, officiating or attending a footabll match.

6. When in doubt leave it out.

If you are unsure if what you are posting on social media is appropriate then it is best not to post it. When in doubt leave it out.

7. Do not tolerate or condone poor social media behaviour or actions.Facebook_logo-7

If you are aware of or observe poor social media behaviour or actions, do not accept it. There is no place for it in daa football club and it will not be condoned. You should remind people of their responsibilities when using social media and warn that action can be taken against them. In the instance of minors breaching the code of conduct, alert their parents to the situation. If you believe the breach is serious, report it to fellow players, managers, club or committee.

8. Be aware that your actions on social media may have serious consequences.

Negative comments and images, bullying, criticism and sexist remarks do not only impact negatively on the people they are about. If you are found to have acted improperly on social media regarding a club related matter, you are liable to disciplinary proceedings and may be required to face a club hearing to explain your actions. A suspension from playing or expulsion from daa football club could be imposed.

twitter-logo9. Consider social media to be your personal brand.

Your Internet presence fuels any perception of your personal brand – whether you like it or not. Does your social media identity match your real identity? Be mindful of the content of photos, status updates, Tweets. Are they truly reflective of who you are and how you want people to see you?
Be responsible for your actions. Ignorance is no defence.


 

Concussion

Football Association of Ireland: Summary Concussion Guidelines

  • Concussion can be defined as a brain injury that arises from trauma to the head, neck or through an impulsive force to the head from elsewhere in the body.
  • Concussion results in a disturbance of brain function and should be treated as a serious and significant injury with potentially fatal consequences.
  •  ANY PLAYER WITH A CONCUSSION OR A SUSPECTED CONCUSSION SHOULD BE REMOVED FROM THE FIELD OF PLAY IMMEDIATELY AND SAFELY AND SHOULD NOT RETURN TO PLAY, TRAINING OR OTHER PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON THE SAME DAY
  • A player does not need to lose consciousness to be concussed
  • The onset of symptoms can occur over minutes but can be delayed for hours
  • The common symptoms of concussion include headache, dizziness, memory loss, disturbance of balance
  • All coaches, parents, referees should familiarise themselves with the pocket concussion recognition tool to assist in identifying concussion.
  • All doctors, physiotherapists and paramedics should familiarise themselves with the pocket concussion recognition tool and with SCAT 3 and Child- Scat 3 to assist in identifying concussions
  • Most concussions (80-90%) resolve over a 7-10 day period but may persist for considerably longer
  • It is very important to note that the symptoms of concussion in children and adolescents can be prolonged and can in certain circumstances last for weeks or months.
  • Concussed players should not be left alone
  • Concussed players should not drive, should not take alcohol and should be escorted home
  • Players who suffer a concussion should consult with their medical practitioner before returning to play.
  • The successful management of concussion is best achieved through physical and mental rest.
  • Medical clearance is necessary in all players who suffer a concussion before they can return to play.
  • There should be a graded return to training activity.
  • Children and adolescents should not return to any activity until they have made a successful return to school/college.
  • Return to play guidelines follows a stepwise approach outlined below.

Stages:

  1. No activity – symptom limited physical and cognitive rest. Recovery is the objective.
  2. Light aerobic activity – walking, swimming, stationary bike. Increase in heart rate is the objective.
  3. Sport specific exercise – running drills. The objective is to add movements.
  4. Non-contact drills – passing drills. The objective is to exercise, add coordination and cognitive load.
  5. Full contact practice – This should be medically cleared. The objective is to restore confidence and assess functional skills by coaching staff.
  6. Return to play.

Dr Alan Byrne

Medical Director

The Football Association of Ireland

 


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